The Divide: Confronting Racism in American Health Care
09:37

The Divide: Confronting Racism in American Health Care

Delmar Avenue, which spans St. Louis, Missouri, from east to west, features million-dollar homes directly to the south and deep poverty to its north. The so-called Delmar Divide represents the racial and socioeconomic segregation that exists in many American cities. That same racially driven divide also exists in the city’s health care. This film investigates the legacy of racism in health care in St. Louis and how one program is attempting to end it. Pipeline to Compassionate Care teaches St. Louis medical students about the ways systemic racism has been built into the health care system, how those injustices have affected people’s lives and health, and how they can be more compassionate and effective care providers. Through interviews with Jamila Michener, Associate Professor, Co-Director, Cornell Center for Health Equity; Bethany Johnson-Jarvois, CEO of St. Louis Integrated Health Network; and Kaytlin Reedy-Rogier, Program Coordinator, Pipeline to Compassionate Care, viewers will learn how the program works to dismantle the effects of systemic racism in health care, one doctor at a time. 0:00 St. Louis' Delmar Divide 0:36 The history of health care in St. Louis 2:38 Intro to the Pipeline to Compassionate Care 4:21 One medical students' journey 5:56 Utilizing trauma-informed care and new practices 7:22 What does the future look like? Learn more about the Commonwealth Fund's work to advance health equity here: https://bit.ly/33XvcuT
Bill of Rights for Automated Society: The Health Care System
01:30:56

Bill of Rights for Automated Society: The Health Care System

White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) Director Eric Lander and Deputy Director for Science and Society Alondra Nelson recently announced that OSTP is engaging a wide array of stakeholders—in industry, academia, government, civil society, and the general public—in a national endeavor to make sure new and emerging data-driven technologies abide by the enduring values of American democracy. OSTP is co-hosting six public events to promote public education and engagement on areas where data-driven technologies intersect with the lives of Americans. These events will bring together a variety of practitioners, advocates, and federal government officials to offer insights and analysis on the risks, harms, benefits, and policy opportunities of artificial intelligence and other automated technologies. Please join the Center for American Progress and OSTP on November 23 for a virtual event. This discussion will explore current and emergent uses of technology in the health care system as well as consumer products related to health. Panelists will discuss the impact of new technologies on health disparities; health care access, delivery, and outcomes; and areas ripe for research and policymaking. The event will conclude with summary remarks about technology, equity, and rights. Introductory remarks: Dr. Alondra Nelson, Deputy Director, Science and Society, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Patrick Gaspard, President and CEO, Center for American Progress Panelists: Finale Doshi-Velez, Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science, Harvard University David S. Jones, A. Bernard Ackerman Professor of the Culture of Medicine, Harvard University Jamila Michener, Associate Professor of Government, Cornell University; Co-Director, Cornell Center for Health Equity Dr. Ziad Obermeyer, Blue Cross of California Distinguished Associate Professor of Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health Dorothy E. Roberts, George A. Weiss University Professor of Law and Sociology; Raymond Pace and Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander Professor of Civil Rights, University of Pennsylvania Mark Schneider, Health Innovation Adviser, ChristianaCare Moderator: Micky Tripathi, National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services